A woman with no top is looking to the side with most of her face covered by hair.

The Troubles and Treatments of Trichotillomania

Have you ever wondered why that person over there can’t seem to stop pulling at their eyebrows?

They don’t seem to be in pain or anything. But pulling out hair doesn’t seem like a typical reaction. Isn’t that a form of self-harm? Should you intervene?

Well, before you go over there and interrupt someone’s day, you might want to consider that this person might have trichotillomania. It’s a hair-pulling disorder that compels people to pull hair from their scalp, eyebrows, or other areas. This can leave obvious bald patches and cause significant distress as these people try to disguise their hair loss. However, in some cases, it’s quite a mild and manageable condition. Not all cases are so lucky, unfortunately.

Either way, though, it is more damaging to go up to a person with this condition and confront them about it. Doing so can make that person feel judged, which could lead them to avoid seeking help for fear of further judgment.

If you want to help someone with trichotillomania, you’re better off learning about the condition first. Luckily, this article is here to guide you on some of the basic facts surrounding trichotillomania and its troubles and treatments.

Trichotillomania can be a serious source of discomfort for sufferers.

An adult is hugging their knees on leaf-covered ground next to a brick building.

The first thing to keep in mind is that trichotillomania can be extremely distressing for those who have it. While some can live with their condition, others are overwhelmed by the loss of the hair and its impact on their lives. And despite their feelings, they’ll still have a strong urge to pull out their hair. So even as they try to disguise bald patches on their scalp with a hat or cover missing spots in their eyebrows with makeup, their situation will still worsen and increase their stress. In turn, they’ll have an even harder time being able to socialize with others due to the self-consciousness that trichotillomania promotes.

But why then does this condition make hairpulling so compelling?

For some people, trichotillomania offers them a way to relieve any tension, stress, or negative emotions they feel. It seems contradictory considering how much stress hair loss can cause. But even so, satisfying their desire to pull out hair can give them a great sense of relief.

For others, trichotillomania is just something they do automatically. So they might start pulling hair without even realizing it while they’re bored, reading, or watching television.

Other symptoms they might encounter include:

  • Getting increased tension before pulling out hair or resisting the urge to pull
  • Feeling pleasure or relief once the hair has been pulled
  • Having visible hair loss
  • Preferring some types of hair over others
  • Applying ritualistic hair-pulling methods or patterns
  • Wanting to bite, chew, or eat any pulled-out hair
  • Playing with the pulled-out hair
  • Rubbing the pulled-out hair across lips or face
  • Attempting to stop pulling out hair with little success
  • Dealing with significant distress over the hair pulling

All of which can add up to a seriously mixed bag of frustration for sufferers.

Many people misunderstand the cause of the condition.

A blonde-haired woman in a blue shirt with white spots has her hand on her forehead in a gesture of frustration.

It doesn’t help either that the general public doesn’t really understand what causes trichotillomania. As a result, there are a few myths out there that need to be dispelled.

Despite some seeming similarities, trichotillomania is not a sign of an obsessive-compulsive disorder.

It’s true that trichotillomania does look similar to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). After all, the two conditions involve repeated, compelling behaviors. But according to The TLC Foundation for Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviors, trichotillomania and OCD both have enough differences to indicate that they are not one and the same. And because of that, trichotillomania is classified under the obsessive-compulsive and related disorders category in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5).

Likewise, trichotillomania should not be viewed as a form of self-mutilation.

Because a significant loss of hair can be seen as distressing, trichotillomania can look like a form of self-mutilation. But it’s not. Self-mutilation is when people try to harm, punish, or distract themselves from emotions they aren’t able to tolerate. In contrast, those who engage in trichotillomania pull hair to feel positive sensations, such as stress relief or gratification—even if the end result is distressing.

Lastly, the condition can be seen as a sign of some hidden trauma, but it shouldn’t be viewed like that in general.

Much like how many can mistake the stress behind trichotillomania as self-mutilation, others might view it as some sort of unresolved issue that needs to be addressed. But in general, that doesn’t seem to be the case. Recent knowledge of trichotillomania has indicated that the condition is not usually a sign of hidden trauma.

So, what does cause it?

A bright neon question mark is surrounded by an equally bright neon square in a grimy hallway.

So, you know now what doesn’t cause trichotillomania. But what is the cause?

Genetic Predispositions

In some cases, the cause of trichotillomania can be a genetic predisposition for body-focused repetitive behaviors (BFRBs). The TLC Foundation for Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviors notes, several studies indicate that a great percentage of people with BFRBs have immediate family members with the same issue. One study even showed how hairpulling can equally affect identical and fraternal twins.

Other Related Factors

But a genetic predisposition is just one potential cause of trichotillomania. There are other factors that may be involved as well, such as:

  • Temperament
  • Environment
  • Age of onset
  • Family stress

How can trichotillomania be treated?

No matter the cause, there are a few ways people can treat their trichotillomania.

Medication

To help minimize the desire to pick or pull at hair, health-care professionals may prescribe medication. While the medication won’t treat trichotillomania itself, it can help people with the condition get through therapy that might otherwise have made them feel too uncomfortable. It can even treat other psychiatric conditions that they may be suffering from like depression.

It can be an expensive minimal treatment, however. After all, Americans pay more for prescription medications compared to most other countries. But there is a way around this expense, though. For instance, international and Canadian pharmacy referral sites like Canada Med Pharmacy ship medication from licensed pharmacies outside of the United States for a much cheaper price than what can be found at the local brick-and-mortar pharmacy.

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy

The most important and effective treatment to look at, however, is cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). This treatment helps patients address their thoughts, feelings, and behaviors in a way that gives them a stronger sense of control over their hairpulling. What’s more, this treatment can involve a technique called habit reversal training, which can help combat the strong compulsion for hairpulling that trichotillomania creates.

But don’t forget that these treatments will only help someone with trichotillomania if they feel ready to be treated. So try not to make them feel ashamed. They need all the encouragement they can get because they’re already doing their best to fight themselves and their condition.

Fortnightly Medical News Round-Up: Scientific Proof You’re Actually Super Tired, Less Invasive HPV Testing, and More

Another fortnight, another round of exciting medical news. Here are some hand-picked highlights from the last two weeks.

We may soon be able to diagnose chronic fatigue syndrome using a blood test.

People tired of being told they’re not tired, who are tired of being tired, may soon have tangible scientific proof of their condition.

Scientists used an electrical current to test immune cells and plasma in blood samples. When the blood samples were stimulated with stress using salt, the electrical current was also affected. Larger changes in the current indicated stressed cells, which was a distinguishing feature in the chronic fatigue patients. The study tested 40 subjects — 20 with chronic fatigue syndrome and 20 without — and accurately flagged all 20 subjects with the condition without flagging the other 20.

People who complain of chronic fatigue syndrome symptoms are often stigmatized by both peers and medical professionals. Doctors may dismiss their concerns as merely imaginary if their bloodwork comes back otherwise normal. Hopefully, new testing methods can soon reduce this stigma. It may even open doors for research into a chronic fatigue-battling drug.

Urine testing may be as effective as pap smears for cervical screenings.

Pap smears aren’t fun, and many women fail to get the necessary screenings done because of the discomfort and embarrassment involved. This is a concern for doctors because the precancerous stage of cervical cancer can be detected as many as five to 10 years before the cancerous stage, allowing for earlier treatment.

Fortunately, UK scientists have found that urine testing may be just as effective as cervical smears to detect high-risk HPV, the virus responsible for causing cervical cancer. The scientists hope that the availability of urine testing may allow more women to participate in regular cervical screening.

Getting screened for HPV regularly is an important part of women’s healthcare. Soon, you may soon be spared the stirrups and the speculum and be able to get a diagnosis in a painless, private way instead.

Morning calisthenics can improve brain power in older adults the rest of the day.

If you’ve ever wondered why your grandparents like to wake up at the break of dawn and do tai chi or go for a brisk walk in the dark, this peculiar habit of theirs may be helping them keep their brains sharp.

A study led by the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute and The University of Western Australia found that in older Australians, moderate intensity exercise in the morning improves decision-making throughout the day when compared with prolonged sitting. They also discovered that frequent, light walking breaks throughout an eight-hour day of sitting can improve memory when compared to sitting without breaks.

The study also found that levels of brain-derived neurotropic growth factor were elevated for eight hours in the subjects that exercised. This protein is important to the survival and growth of neurons that transmit information in the brain.

Obesity and emotional issues may develop as early as age seven.

Adults who assume children lead stress-free lives may need to listen to their kids more carefully. Presented at the European Congress on Obesity (taking place April 28 to May 1), a study found that children who were obese at age seven were at higher risk of emotional issues at age 11, which then predicted a higher body mass index at age 14.

The study was quite comprehensive, using data from 17,215 children born in the UK participating in the Millennium Cohort Study. The researchers adjusted for factors like gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status, but they did admit that the study has certain flaws, such as basing data on parental reporting, not the child’s own reporting.

Stay tuned for more health and wellness news!

Unique Health Tips for LGBTQ+ Women

Despite sharing many of the same health concerns as heterosexual, cis-gender women, those who identify as LGBTQ+ women face unique health-care challenges. Unfortunately, inclusive health-care education is lacking, so many people simply grow up without knowing the relevant aspects about safer sex. But this article is here to help inform everyone on some LGBTQ+ health-care tips!

Accessing Healthcare

LGBTQ+ women may face additional barriers to accessing healthcare because LGBTQ+ people in general are disproportionately low-income. If you relate to this, consider the following alternative resources:

  • Low-cost and community health centers may offer sliding scale or free health services.
  • Your local city or state LGBTQ+ advocacy organization may have suggestions, so call them up!
  • You can also find substantially cheaper medication online through international and Canadian pharmacy referral services. These websites link American patients to licensed pharmacies located in countries where drug prices are more strictly regulated.
Two Woman Wearing Blue and Red Sport Shirts and Sunglasses Lying on Brown Surface

General Healthcare

Sadly, LGBTQ+ women are at increased risk for a number of medical conditions. This may be because, put bluntly, it’s stressful to be part of an oppressed minority. When you deal with discrimination every day, taking care of yourself can fall off the priority list.

Be aware that LGBTQ+ women are more at risk for:

  • Breast cancer, cardiovascular disease, and gynecological cancers
  • Depression, anxiety, and substance abuse
  • Obesity and inactivity

To avoid these health concerns, ask your health-care provider about health screenings, and remember to get yourself checked up on a regular basis. The CDC provides a comprehensive list of LGBTQ+-friendly health clinics across the country here.

Wait, pregnancy?!

When you think about LGBTQ+ women’s health issues, pregnancy concerns may be furthest from your mind. After all, two women can’t conceive, right? However, do note that trans women are women too, and they may still possess the equipment necessary to make someone pregnant.

Also, just because a woman identifies as LGBTQ+, doesn’t mean they don’t have sex with cis-gender men. Therefore, a woman who has intimate relationships with someone who may be able to get her pregnant should take the same precautions as cis-gender, straight women. This may mean taking hormonal birth control pills, using condoms, or getting an IUD device.

LGBTQ+ women can get STIs too!

There has been much focus on gay men and the HIV/AIDS crisis of the 80s. While health education for gay men is immensely important, sadly, less focus has been put on LGBTQ+ women’s health.

Some women assume that by having sex with other women, less bodily fluids are exchanged and therefore the risk of getting a sexually transmitted infection (STI) is low. Unfortunately, this is not true. For example, HPV is common among women who have sex with women, as this virus can spread through skin-to-skin contact. Bacterial vaginosis is also more common among women who have sex with women than women who have sex with men. Untreated bacterial vaginosis may increase your risk of other STDs, such as chlamydia, gonorrhea, and even HIV.

To help prevent these diseases from spreading, apply the following safer sex habits:

  • Use barriers like dental dams and gloves.
  • Put condoms on shared penetrative sex toys.
  • Wash sex toys thoroughly before sharing them, and wash your hands as well.
  • Get screened for STIs frequently.
  • Let medical staff know you have sex with women.

Trans Healthcare

Trans women have unique health needs that may require specialized care. For example, the hormones they use to transition can interact harmfully with medications, and what’s more, trans folks are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease.

Furthermore, transitioning itself is a complex medical process that requires a lot of time, care, and often times, money. Unfortunately, not transitioning can be extremely distressing.

If you identify as trans, it’s important that you find a health-care provider you trust to discuss this issue openly. You can learn more about health insurance and trans health here. Be aware that some insurance providers do not cover services related to trans healthcare and that you have the right to report discrimination to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.

Woman Wearing Blue Mortarboard Cap Standing Near Woman Wearing Blue Jacket

Mental Healthcare

Systemic discrimination can put an immense strain on the mental health of any LGBTQ+ individual. Moreover, many LGBTQ+ individuals come from other minority groups. They are people of color, have disabilities, or deal with limited financial resources.

Furthermore, as an LGBTQ+ woman, you’re not exempt from problems that plague everyone else. This includes moving out for the first time, toxic or abusive relationships, and mental illness.

Social isolation is another problem. Those who are estranged from homophobic or transphobic family and friends can lack important social supports.

A Word about Domestic Violence

The stereotype that women don’t fight physically like men creates the wrong belief that women-only relationships don’t experience domestic violence. In fact, health-care providers may fail to ask about this. So if you have an abusive partner, be aware that you too can access women’s shelters, and make sure your health-care provider knows.

If you’re struggling, you deserve mental health support, even if it’s just a chat with a compassionate ear. Good places to start include the LGBT National Help Center hotline or the LGBT National Youth Talkline. The Association of LGBTQ+ Psychiatrists can also help you find an LGBTQ+-friendly mental health professional.

We’ve come a long way.

Despite the obvious shortcomings still pervasive in the health-care system, LGBTQ+ women’s health and women’s health in general has improved drastically in recent decades. From Sappho to Stonewall, we’ve come a long way. Hopefully, more positive changes will come at the other end of the rainbow.

Person Holding Multicolored Heart Decor
The title "Fortnightly Medical News Round-Up: Serving Up Food for Thought" is overtop a table covered in breakfast foods and a newspaper.

Fortnightly Medical News Round-Up: Serving Up Food for Thought

Hungry to learn more about the latest medical news?

Then, join me as I tuck into some of the most recent juicy details.

A plant-based diet may help you fight against gingivitis.

Vibrant, veiny green leaves from a cabbage are in full view.

Ever wanted to keep your teeth nice and healthy? Well, recent research indicates that you might be able to do just that by changing your diet!

This research comes directly from a randomized trial published by the Journal of Clinical Periodontology. During the four-week trial, researchers took 30 participants and split them into two groups. One group kept their original diet. And the other group changed their diet to one low in processed carbohydrates and animal proteins, but rich in omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin C, vitamin D, antioxidants, plant nitrates (i.e., plant chemicals), and fibres. Both groups were subjected to interdental cleaning, and at the end of the trial, researchers discovered that the group with the changed diet were able to significantly reduce gingivitis.

So, consider taking on a similar diet! Your teeth might thank you.

For more information about the studied plant-based diet, click here.

Breast milk could impact how childhood obesity is handled.

A baby in a bear-head-shaped hat is holding on to their mother's shoulder.

If you’re a mother to a newborn baby, you’re probably more interested in protecting the weight and diet of your child.

Well, science has something for you too. From The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, a study was recently published on breastfeeding children. The study focused on differences between mothers under 25 kg/m2 who were breastfeeding and mothers who were breastfeeding while over 25 kg/m2. And researchers soon discovered mothers with obesity who breastfed their children were providing those children with different metabolism substances that may make the children more prone to childhood obesity.

While this study only shows the possibility of a connection between breastfeeding and childhood obesity, it could be an important one to be aware of as you care for your baby. But before you take any extreme measures, talk with your doctor. They’ll have a better idea if there is a great risk to you and your baby.

You can also take the time to learn a bit more about breastfeeding and childhood obesity by clicking here to read directly from The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition’s study.

Eggs are the breakfast of champions for diabetics.

Several eggs are on a tray frying over a fire next to some frying bacon.

Another study from The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition indicates that eggs might actually benefit people who have type 2 diabetes. More specifically, research from the study shows that if type 2 diabetics eat a breakfast high in fat and low in carbohydrates, they seem to have better control over their blood sugar levels for the rest of the day.

Luckily, eggs fit the bill for a high-fat, low-carb meal. So, if you happen to have type 2 diabetes, consider making your morning meal more eggcellent.

To learn more about the impact of such a meal, take a look at the study’s summary here.

Seasoning your food with salt may be unhealthy, but you might still be able to keep the taste.

A salt shaker is in the foreground against the background of a dining place.

If you’re looking for a way to season your breakfast, afternoon, or dinner meals, salt might be one item you think about. More specifically, you probably think of the most common blend of salt: sodium chloride. While it certainly can create a savory flavor, consuming too much sodium chloride can be problematic. If enough excess sodium chloride is consumed, you can end up stiffening your blood vessels, which can eventually lead to high blood pressure, heart attacks, and strokes.

But science is here to offer a solution!

As part of a study in the Journal of Food Science, researchers looked at different salt blends to see how they could keep the salty flavor while lowering the amount of sodium chloride. So far, the most optimal blend of salt that they found consisted of 96.4% sodium chloride, 1.6% potassium chloride, and 2% calcium chloride. But they may very well find an even better blend at some point in the future.

So, look forward to new and improved salt with the same flavor, but with less of a negative impact on your health!

Take a look at more of the salty details here.

Fortnightly Medical News Round-Up: Newfound Scientific Advantages

From Skrillex ruining the days and nights for mosquitoes to birth control you can wear on your ears, plenty of exciting stuff has been happening in the medical world lately. Let’s check out some stories.

Electronic music repels mosquitoes.

brown mosquito

Remember this one for your summer camping trip! According to one study, it turns out that blasting electronic music — in this particular study, Skrillex’s “Scary Monsters and Nice Sprites” — reduced feeding behavior in the female Aedes aegypti mosquito. The study also noted that adult mosquitoes kept in an environment with music copulated less.

Why does music like that of Skrillex affect mosquitoes? Well, it appears that sound disrupts the low-frequency vibrations insects use to communicate with each other. This is an exciting finding, given how most of us vehemently hate getting bit by mosquitoes. It’s also exciting that the particular species studied, Aedes aegypti, carries the dengue virus. This virus can cause dengue fever in humans, a flu-like illness with no known treatment. So playing Skrillex could be a literal life-saver.

For more information, take a look at the original abstract here.

Midnight toilet trips are linked to hypertension.

Do you frequently get up in the middle of the night to visit the bathroom? If so, you might want to get your blood pressure checked out.

Scientists in Japan, a country with a relatively high salt intake, have found a link between nocturia — the need to urinate at night — and high blood pressure. However, the researchers did note that although getting up to urinate at night meant subjects had a 40% higher chance of having hypertension, it didn’t mean there was a causal effect between the two. But it’s good to know that previous studies have associated high salt intake with nocturia. So if you have been dealing with frequent midnight toilet trips, you may want to consider cutting down on the ramen noodles.

You can check out the original press release for this news here.

High-tech pajamas could help you sleep better.

Toddler Sleeping While Sucking Pacifier

When was the last time you had a good night’s sleep? Like most people in the helter-skelter modern world, you probably don’t get enough quality sleep. Well, a new technology aims to help you change that.

The Phyjama contains textile patches of sensors that can monitor a sleeper’s heartbeat, breathing, and sleep position. This data can give both ordinary sleepy Joes and medical professionals valuable, unobtrusive insight into sleeping habits. The team of inventors estimates that the Phyjama can be available to buy within two years. And it’s not super expensive either; it could cost between $100 and $200.

See the original press release about this exciting new product here. This research will be presented at the American Chemical Society meeting.

The future could soon include fashionable, wearable birth control.

Woman in Silver Framed Eyeglasses and Red Top

You may soon be able to go out stylish and safe thanks to wearable birth control. Scientists are testing a transdermal patch that can be attached to earrings and worn by women. This patch can be attached to the backs of jewelry pieces like earrings where it will then release the contraceptive through the skin.

Transdermal patches for other medical purposes have been around for some time, but they have never been incorporated into jewelry. Scientists are hoping that by doing so, contraception would be more appealing and discreet for women. This technology may also be useful in areas where long-term birth control devices like implants and IUDs are harder to access.

Learn more about this product here.

The future might also even let you grow babies from outside your body!

white land animal

If you’re wondering if we can grow babies outside our bodies and save on some labor pains, we’re not there just yet. But scientists are a step closer now. As a result, we are better able to support extremely premature babies on the border of viability (i.e., 21–24 weeks). Scientists have even been able to create an artificial womb that has successfully maintained preterm lamb fetuses at an age equivalent to 24 weeks of human gestation.

This technology is being hailed as a four-minute mile break in the field, and you can learn more about it here.

Don’t Get Your Dander Up about Adult-Onset Pet Allergies

Pets are family members — even when you have allergies.

As a pet owner, you know all about the benefits of owning a pet. Whether it’s your companion’s unconditional love or the stress relief they bring, your pet has brought you joy over the years.

So, why do you suddenly feel itchy and irritated around your animal companion?

Sadly, it sounds like you’ve developed a pet allergy. Yes, allergies can develop in adulthood. But don’t fret! Take the time today to learn all about your newfound allergy and how you can keep it from coming between your animal companion and you.

Why would you develop an allergy now?

While you might not have had one before, allergies can develop at any point in life. This typically happens once your body starts to view certain allergens (i.e., substances that can cause allergic reactions) as a threat to your immune system. For pet allergies, this might mean your body ends up viewing substances like your pet’s dander, saliva, or skin flakes as a threat.

To defend your health, your body will produce large numbers of cells to fight off the substances. This defense will then cause a certain physical reaction, depending on the number of allergens encountered and how your body reacts to them. So, you could end up with the following symptoms or more:

  • Itchy, watery eyes
  • Nasal congestion
  • Hives

An allergy can be serious, but it doesn’t mean you need to let your pet go.

Your pet is like another family member. You’ve spent time caring for and playing with them, and in turn, they have given you their trust.

Don’t abandon that trust by letting your pet go just because you have mild or moderate allergies. There are ways to reduce your symptoms.

However, it is understandable and heartbreaking if your reaction is much more severe. If you’ve been dealing with anaphylaxis from your pet allergy, which is not one of the common anaphylactic triggers, you may actually have to think about rehoming your pet. One way to make this act less traumatic is to consider getting a close friend or family member to adopt.

For those with non-life-threatening allergic reactions, try to think of what’s best for you and your animal companion. You’re family members, and presumably, you’ve loved each other’s company, so do your best to reduce your allergic reactions so you two can stay together.

Give these allergen reduction methods a try.

If you are determined to stay with your pet, know that there’ll be a tough road ahead for you two. It’ll take time and testing to determine what reduces your allergic reactions. But for a start, consider following these suggestions.

Turn your bedroom into an allergen-free space.

A bed in blue and white is right next to a white geode lamp in a gray and white room.

You might have enjoyed having your bedroom as a space for both you and your pet to relax. But this lifestyle may have to change.

According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, your bedroom is usually the one area of your home with the highest amount of allergens. After all, on average, Americans spend a third of their lives in their bedrooms. So it doesn’t take long for allergens to build up.

To avoid this dilemma entirely, turn your bedroom into an allergen-free zone. It can be difficult training your pet to accept that they cannot enter your bedroom anymore, but training is a lot less painful compared to rehoming your pet.

Once you’ve gotten your pet accustomed to not entering your bedroom, you’ll have a space that will be almost completely free from pet allergens. But you’ll also need to get into a regular cleaning routine.

Clean your home regularly.

A vacuum rests near a pair of white shoes against a blue and white carpet.

Cleaning might feel like a chore, but it’s one of the best ways you can reduce the number of allergens your body encounters. After all, cleaning will help you remove any allergens or dirt particles that might be hanging around your home. So get better acquainted with vacuuming and doing the laundry regularly.

Purify the air in your home.

A number of blue-tinted windows from a gray building are facing forward.

Part of your routine cleaning might include directly purifying the air of your home.

To do this, look into getting an air purifier. It’s a cleaning machine designed to remove pollutants from the air. And for extra filtering, make sure the machine you choose is one that has a high efficiency particulate arresting (HEPA) filter attached. This filter will help your purifier catch common allergens that like to collect around your home.

Sanitize your pet.

A person is holding a shower head to wash their dog.

Don’t forget to clean your pet frequently, too!

The ASPCA suggests you bathe your pet at least once weekly. Giving your pet a frequent wash will not only keep them clean, but it will also wash away any allergens that might bother your allergies. You can also wipe your pet with products that are designed to prevent dander. And remember: brush or comb your pet regularly.

All this grooming should give you a simple, effective way of reducing both your pet’s allergens and your allergy symptoms.

If you still have harsh enough allergic reactions, consider immunotherapy.

So, you’ve tried out all those suggestions before, and they didn’t work. You don’t feel like you’re having an anaphylactic reaction, but your allergies are still way too frustrating for you. Now, what?

It may be time to consider talking to your doctor about immunotherapy. This method involves injecting the pet allergen directly into your blood stream. While there are risks, this method is generally safe and ensures that your body gets used to being around the allergen. After enough time, your body will stop reacting so harshly whenever it encounters the allergen. And you should be able to enjoy spending time with your pet again without worry!

In short, you and your pet do not need to part ways because of your allergies. Just take the time and effort needed to see what you can do to reduce your symptoms.

6 Physical Features Unique to Homo Sapiens

As humans, we tend to think of our bodies as being less capable than many others in the animal kingdom. We can’t run as fast as most animals, nor can we track prey by scent or fly. Yet, we human beings actually have a number of physical features that are unique to us. At times, these features even enable us to out-cool our fellow animal brethren.

  1. Superior vision

While many other animals have color vision, many others do not. Our cats and dogs have very limited color vision compared to us. Scientists believe humans and other primates developed color vision as a means to discern ripe fruit in forest habitats. We also use the color of our faces to express ourselves to others, blushing when we’re shy and going pale with fright. It’s true that our vision is superior to many animals. After all, vision plays a large role in reading, writing, and art – forms of communication not found in any other animal – as well as deciphering intricate facial expressions.

Still, many animals have us beat when it comes to vision. Animals like reptiles and insects can see infrared and ultraviolet light.

2. Sweat and long distance running

Did you know you can outrun a horse? That’s right! Humans are one of few animals that can run continuously for long distances. This is perhaps due to our unique ability to sweat, a mechanism that lets us cool off while we run. Other animals don’t sweat or sweat differently, so although they may outrun us at the beginning of a race, they cannot maintain a constant speed.

Scientists posit that our long distance running ability may have helped our ancestors tire out prey in the savannah. However, our running prowess is no match for huskies, which can change the way they burn fat and run long distances seemingly without pain.

3. Menstrual cycle

The menstrual cycle womb-bearing humans are familiar with is strangely absent from most mammals with the exception of primates. Your dog or cat has something called an estrous cycle. When an animal is in estrous, it is referred to as being in heat. These animals will only copulate during time periods when they are in heat, and most can reabsorb their endometrium (lining of the uterus) if fertilization does not occur. Humans, on the other hand, shed their endometrium, a process those of us with periods every month are familiar with. We also don’t go into heat, allowing us to get it on all year round.

4. Dextrous hands

Many primates have opposable thumbs just like us, but humans are unique in that we can bring our thumbs all the way across our hand to touch our ring and pinky fingers. This gives us exceptional dexterity. So, while monkeys and apes can pluck fruit from trees with ease, we humans are capable of far more intricate handiwork. This has allowed us to weave cloth, write down information, and construct intricate pieces of technology.

5. Musicality

It is no coincidence that music exists in every human civilization. From the grand orchestras of Europe to the percussive complexities of Africa, nearly everyone finds comfort, community, celebration, and more in music.

Humans are unique in that we can process melody, harmony, and rhythm simultaneously. A few animals have shown signs that they can too, but only anecdotally. We humans also use our vocal cords in unique and complex ways, singing songs and pronouncing words.

6. Bipedalism

It’s no surprise that few animals walk on two legs the way we do. While two legs are slower than four, scientists believed our two-legged habit gave us unprecedented evolutionary advantages. For example, when our ancestors left the forest for the savannah, having two legs allowed them to stand up and look over tall grass. Bipedalism also allowed us to free our hands to grasp tools and carry things. It has even been posited that bipedalism helped us thermoregulate more efficiently.

Our traits allow us to adopt a unique niche

Humans may seem clumsy and slow next to, say, a graceful antelope or even a prowling housecat, but we have specialized traits that have allowed us to excel in our unique niche. With our ability to manipulate tools, communicate through complex means, and of course our brainpower, humans have successfully dominated the planet. However, we’re still far from being the most successful; earthworms, algae, and bacteria have been here a lot longer than us and take that honor. At least for now.