Fortnightly Medical News Round-Up: Serving Up Food for Thought

Hungry to learn more about the latest medical news?

Then, join me as I tuck into some of the most recent juicy details.

A plant-based diet may help you fight against gingivitis.

Vibrant, veiny green leaves from a cabbage are in full view.

Ever wanted to keep your teeth nice and healthy? Well, recent research indicates that you might be able to do just that by changing your diet!

This research comes directly from a randomized trial published by the Journal of Clinical Periodontology. During the four-week trial, researchers took 30 participants and split them into two groups. One group kept their original diet. And the other group changed their diet to one low in processed carbohydrates and animal proteins, but rich in omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin C, vitamin D, antioxidants, plant nitrates (i.e., plant chemicals), and fibres. Both groups were subjected to interdental cleaning, and at the end of the trial, researchers discovered that the group with the changed diet were able to significantly reduce gingivitis.

So, consider taking on a similar diet! Your teeth might thank you.

For more information about the studied plant-based diet, click here.

Breast milk could impact how childhood obesity is handled.

A baby in a bear-head-shaped hat is holding on to their mother's shoulder.

If you’re a mother to a newborn baby, you’re probably more interested in protecting the weight and diet of your child.

Well, science has something for you too. From The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, a study was recently published on breastfeeding children. The study focused on differences between mothers under 25 kg/m2 who were breastfeeding and mothers who were breastfeeding while over 25 kg/m2. And researchers soon discovered mothers with obesity who breastfed their children were providing those children with different metabolism substances that may make the children more prone to childhood obesity.

While this study only shows the possibility of a connection between breastfeeding and childhood obesity, it could be an important one to be aware of as you care for your baby. But before you take any extreme measures, talk with your doctor. They’ll have a better idea if there is a great risk to you and your baby.

You can also take the time to learn a bit more about breastfeeding and childhood obesity by clicking here to read directly from The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition’s study.

Eggs are the breakfast of champions for diabetics.

Several eggs are on a tray frying over a fire next to some frying bacon.

Another study from The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition indicates that eggs might actually benefit people who have type 2 diabetes. More specifically, research from the study shows that if type 2 diabetics eat a breakfast high in fat and low in carbohydrates, they seem to have better control over their blood sugar levels for the rest of the day.

Luckily, eggs fit the bill for a high-fat, low-carb meal. So, if you happen to have type 2 diabetes, consider making your morning meal more eggcellent.

To learn more about the impact of such a meal, take a look at the study’s summary here.

Seasoning your food with salt may be unhealthy, but you might still be able to keep the taste.

A salt shaker is in the foreground against the background of a dining place.

If you’re looking for a way to season your breakfast, afternoon, or dinner meals, salt might be one item you think about. More specifically, you probably think of the most common blend of salt: sodium chloride. While it certainly can create a savory flavor, consuming too much sodium chloride can be problematic. If enough excess sodium chloride is consumed, you can end up stiffening your blood vessels, which can eventually lead to high blood pressure, heart attacks, and strokes.

But science is here to offer a solution!

As part of a study in the Journal of Food Science, researchers looked at different salt blends to see how they could keep the salty flavor while lowering the amount of sodium chloride. So far, the most optimal blend of salt that they found consisted of 96.4% sodium chloride, 1.6% potassium chloride, and 2% calcium chloride. But they may very well find an even better blend at some point in the future.

So, look forward to new and improved salt with the same flavor, but with less of a negative impact on your health!

Take a look at more of the salty details here.